Rosemary Ormus

Rosemary is a Mediterranean herb with needle-like leaves and pink, blue, or purple flowers. The word "rosemary" comes from the Latin words ros (meaning "dew") and marinus (meaning "sea").

It is used in many culinary dishes and is commonly used to flavor soups, sauces, and meats. In addition to being used in cooking, it has also been used as a natural remedy for a variety of ailments over the centuries. Studies have found that our ancestors weren't wrong in using it medicinally.

Rosemary leaves contain certain phyto-chemical (plant derived) compounds that are known to have disease preventing and health promoting properties.

Vitamin A is essential for the formation and maintenance of healthy teeth, skeletal and soft tissue, mucous membranes, and skin. It is also very important for eye health. Beta-carotene, a precursor for vitamin A, is a carotenoid that gives plant foods their color. This antioxidant can protect against damage from free radicals which are believed to play a role in certain diseases and in the degenerative aging process. Rosemary contains 68.80 IU of vitamin A in each serving, or 1.38% of the recommended daily value.

 

Vitamin B6 is a water soluble vitamin also known as pyridoxine. It is primarily used in protein metabolism and to make hemoglobin, a protein in red blood cells that helps carry oxygen to the body tissues. Rosemary provides 0.04 milligrams of the 1.3 milligrams needed for healthy adults.

 

Vitamin C is essential for the growth and repair of body tissues and in the optimal functioning of the immune system. Rosemary provides 1.36 milligrams in each 2 teaspoon portion which is a little over 2% of the daily value for adults. The vitamin C in rosemary also helps the body better absorb the non-heme iron content of the herb (0.64 milligrams)

 

Women, especially those in their child-bearing years, need good sources of folate. Rosemary contributes 6.76 micrograms in each serving which is 1.69% of the daily value. Males and non-pregnant females need 400 micrograms per day, and pregnant and lactating women need between 500 and 600 micrograms daily.

 

Calcium, magnesium, and manganese are essential minerals for both bone health and cardiovascular health. Rosemary can add 28 milligrams of calcium (2.8% of the daily value), 4.84 milligrams of magnesium (1.2%), and 0.04 milligrams of manganese (2.0%) to the diet.

Other Nutritional Compounds

In addition to familiar vitamins and minerals, rosemary contains other nutritional compounds that are considered to be highly effective antioxidants. These compounds include rosmarinic acid which has anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial action in addition to being an antioxidant. It has also been used in food preservation to improve the shelf life of foods such as fresh seafood.

The herb parts, especially flower tops contain phenolic anti-oxidant rosmarinic acid as well as numerous health benefiting volatile essential oils such as cineol, camphene, borneol, bornyl acetate, a-pinene, etc. These compounds are known to have rubefacient (counterirritant), anti-inflammatory, anti-allergic, anti-fungal and anti-septic properties.

Rosemary leaves provide just 131 calories per 100 g and contain no cholesterol. Apart from nutrients, this humble herb contains many noteworthy non-nutrient components such as dietary fiber (37% of RDA).

The herb is exceptionally rich in many B-complex groups of vitamin, such as folic acid, pantothenic acid, pyridoxine, riboflavin. It is one of the herbs containing high levels of folates; providing about 109 µg per 100 g (about 27% of RDA). Folates are important in DNA synthesis and when given during the peri-conception period can help prevent neural tube defects in the newborn babies.

Rosemary herb carry very good amounts of vitamin A, 2924 IU per 100 g; about 97% of RDA. A few leaves a day in the diet, would contribute enough of this vitamin. Vitamin A is known to have antioxidant properties and is essential for vision. It is also required for maintaining healthy mucusa and skin. Consumption of natural foods rich in vitamin A is known to help the body protect from lung and oral cavity cancers.

Fresh rosemary leaves are a good source of antioxidant vitamin; vitamin-C containing about 22 mg per 100 g, about 37% of RDA. The vitamin is required for the collagen synthesis in the body. Collagen is the main structural protein in the body required for maintaining the integrity of blood vessels, skin, organs, and bones. Regular consumption of foods rich in vitamin C helps the body protect from scurvy; develop resistance against infectious agents (boosts immunity) and help scavenge harmful, pro-inflammatory free radicals from the body.

Rosemary herb parts, whether fresh or dried, are rich source of minerals like potassium, calcium, iron, manganese, copper, and magnesium. Potassium is an important component of cell and body fluids, which helps control heart rate and blood pressure. Manganese is used by the body as a co-factor for the antioxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase.

This herb is an excellent source of iron, contains 6.65 mg/100 g of fresh leaves (about 83% of RDA). Iron, being a component of hemoglobin inside the red blood cells, determines the oxygen-carrying capacity of the blood.


I think you'll be amazed as we were to find out just how many benefits rosemary has. Here are 16 health benefits of rosemary that'll make you want to use it on a regular basis.

Cancer Prevention
Rosemary contains carnosol which has been found in studies to be a potent anti-cancer compound. Researchers have had promising results in studies of its efficacy against breast cancer, prostate cancer, colon cancer, leukemia, and skin cancer. In one study, researchers gave powdered rosemary to rats for two weeks and found that it reduced the binding of the carcinogen given to the rats by 76% and significantly inhibited the formation of breast tumors.

Improved Memory
Rosemary has long been believed to have memory-enhancing properties. In 1529, an herbal book recommended taking rosemary for "weakness of the brain." Today, research has found that rosemary contains a diterpine called carnosic acid that has neuroprotective properties that researchers believe may protect against Alzheimer's disease as well as the normal memory loss that happens with aging.

Remarkably, even the smell of rosemary has been found to improve memory. Test subjects in cubicles were given essential oil of rosemary to smell and they had better quality of memory and better overall memory than the control group, though their speed of memory was slower compared to the control group.

Mood Elevator
The same study that found that smelling rosemary improved test subjects' quality of memory also found that their mood was significantly improved compared to the control group.

Migraine Help
Rosemary has been a popular natural migraine remedy for centuries. Boil some rosemary in a large pot of water and pour it into a bowl. Place a towel over your head and lean over the pot to inhale the steam for about 10 minutes. Because smelling rosemary has been found to improve memory and mood, this method may also help with memory function and put you in a better state of mind.

Pain Relief
It not only helps relieve the pain of migraines, but essential oil of rosemary can also be applied topically as a natural treatment for arthritis, sore muscles, and other joint and muscle pains.

Anti-Inflammatory
Rosemary contains two potent anti-inflammatories, carnosic acid and carnosol. One study found that these two compounds inhibited COX-2, an enzyme that causes pain and inflammation in the body. They also inhibited the production of excess nitric oxide, which also plays a role in the inflammatory process.

Immune Booster
Rosemary boosts the immune system thanks to its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-carcinogenic properties. Because it is healing in so many ways, it boosts the overall health of the body.

Antibacterial
Studies have found that rosemary has powerful antibacterial properties against H. pylori (the bacteria that causes stomach ulcers) and Staph infections.

Digestive Health
Rosemary is often used to help treat digestive problems such as upset stomach, constipation, indigestion, and almost any other digestive related problem. It also helps to prevent foodborne illnesses when ingested with foods such as meat or eggs.

Hair Growth
There is a possibility that rosemary may stimulate hair growth. One study found that people with alopecia, a disorder that causes the hair to fall out, had significant hair regrowth after rubbing rosemary, lavender, thyme, and cedarwood into their scalps for seven months. However, it is not clear whether it was the rosemary or the other herbs that caused the regrowth.

Better Circulation
Essential oil of rosemary is often applied topically as a natural remedy for poor circulation, though there have been no studies to prove this effect.

Fresh Breath
Rosemary can be used as a natural mouthwash and is said to work very well. To make the mouthwash, steep fresh rosemary in a pint of heated water. Strain it and use it as a mouth rinse as often as you like. It will keep in the fridge if covered.

Diuretic Properties
Rosemary is a mild diuretic, which means that it can help get rid of bloating and water retention in the body. When rosemary is used regularly, it may help in the increase of urine flow and help the kidneys function at optimal levels to help get rid of excess water in the body.

Respiratory Health
Rosemary is a great natural remedy for respiratory problems. Breathing in the scent of the essential oil may help with congestion due to colds, allergies, respiratory infections, and the flu. You may also boil fresh rosemary in a pot of water, place it in a bowl, and breathe in the steam to help clear the lungs and throat. This will also help with any sinus or head pain associated with respiratory conditions.

Liver Detoxification
Rosemary has been used to treat liver problems for hundreds of years. Hippocrates prescribed it for this purpose. One study found that rosemary extract reduces cirrhosis in rats given thioacetamide, a toxic compound that is toxic to the liver. It also prevented liver damage from tetrachloride in rats and mice.

Anti-Aging
Rosemary is a popular ingredient in anti-aging skin creams because it helps reduce puffiness, stimulates cell regeneration, increases firmness, and improves overall skin tone. It is a natural anti-inflammatory and increases blood flow to the skin. 


History


As for Rosmarine, I lett it runne all over my garden walls, not onlie because my bees love it, but because it is the herb sacred to remembrance, and, therefore, to friendship; whence a sprig of it hath a dumb language that maketh it the chosen emblem of our funeral wakes and in our burial grounds." -- Sir Thomas More (1478-1535)

Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) is a woody evergreen native to the Mediterranean and a universal symbol of remembrance used to honor those who have passed on. The tradition of laying sprigs of rosemary across the coffin or upon a tombstone dates back to ancient Egypt. This custom continued well into the medieval period and beyond. For instance, Shakespeare’s Juliet was bestowed with rosemary upon her untimely death. In Australia, where Anzac Day is celebrated in remembrance of one’s family ancestors, it is still customary to wear sprigs of rosemary today.

Rosemary is also associated with enhancing memory and recall. Shakespeare's Ophelia petitions Hamlet with, "There's rosemary, that's for remembrance, pray you love, remember." Scholars of ancient Greece wore wreaths of rosemary about the brow to help improve recall while taking exams. This reputation has earned the herb a place among traditional wedding herbs used to grace the bride’s bouquet, headpiece, and dress. Wedding guests are also given sprigs of rosemary to wear to help them remember the occasion. It was also once common to add rosemary to the couple’s wine to help them remember their sacred vows to each other. At one time, it was customary for the bride and groom to plant rosemary near the marital threshold on their day of matrimony. However, the old saying "where rosemary flourished, the woman ruled," prompted some husbands to pluck the plant from the ground lest anyone should think he wasn’t fit to rule the roost. Perhaps this is why the practice fell out of favor by the late 15th century.

Rosemary takes its name from the Latin ros maris, which means “dew of the sea.” This is likely in reference to the herb’s preference for growing along the seashore of its indigenous domain. The Spanish began to call the plant Romero because they believed that another Mediterranean native took refuge beneath a large rosemary bush to shelter herself and her young son as they fled to Egypt to escape Herod. In honor of this brave, young woman, the plant came to be known as Rose of Mary, which was eventually shortened to the modern name familiar to us today.

During the Middle Ages, rosemary was thought to be capable of dispelling negativity. As such, it was tucked under pillows to thwart nightmares and visits from evil spirits. It was also burned in the house to keep the black plague from entering. Perhaps this association with protection is why rosemary is still a common ingredient in incense used to cleanse sacred spaces. It was also thought to promote prosperity. In fact, 16th century merchants would often hire perfumers to infuse their shops with spirits of rosemary. The herb was also a popular addition to nosegays, wreaths, and other floral displays to encourage happiness of home and hearth.

Medicinally, rosemary has a wealth of uses, both old and new. In one of the earliest herbals known to be printed in England, Rycharde Banckes recommended that one gather leaves of rosemary and “…boyle them in fayre water and drinke that water for it is much worthe against all manner of evils in the body." Indeed, rosemary was once thought to be a cure for poor digestion, migraine, joint disorders, and muscle aches. In fact, Queen Elizabeth of Hungary was reputedly cured of semi-paralysis when she sipped a concoction of rosemary to ease her painful joints. Hence, this formula came to be known as the infamous Hungary Water.

Today, rosemary is recognized as possessing several medicinal properties. For one thing, the plant contains salicylic acid, the forerunner of aspirin. This may explain why massaging the oil of rosemary into joints effectively eases arthritic or rheumatic pain. It also contains antibacterial and antimicrobial agents, and is used by modern herbalists to treat a variety of skin disorders, including dandruff. Rosemary is also being studied for its potential anti-cancer effects since initial studies indicate that its compounds inhibit carcinogenic chemicals from binding to cellular DNA. Rosemary may also become useful in preventing and treating Alzheimer's disease in the near future. Researchers have discovered that certain phytochemicals in the herb prevent the degradation of acetylcholine, an important brain chemical needed for normal neurotransmission. A deficiency of this chemical is commonly seen in Alzheimer's patients.


Rosemary Ormus

To make this I first started by taking harmonically and hexagonally structured water and then made tea with the Rosemary leaves. Then I added Dead Sea Salt and Natron on the full moon of November of 2015. Finally after washing it 3 times, this powerful elixir is ready.

 

Limited Supplies: Since only a limited amount is made during each full moon this is for 1oz of Ormus. At a drop or two a day this will last you around 1-3 months

Benefits:

Full Spectrum

Mental Clarity

Rejuvenation

Improves Vision

Increases Intuition

Sense of Calmness

Better Communication Between Cells

Locally collected Ormus minerals made with gourmet Dead Sea Salt, Rosemary, and harmonically structured water.

Just like how the tide is higher during the full moon, more Ormus elements are in the air during a full moon night. This explains why collecting dew during a full moon has more Ormus elements and why during a full moon people inhale more of these element which has effects on our behavior.

So when I make my Ormus I put it in a fish tank and put tubes from fish bubblers into the jars to pull these elements out of the air into the jar which then traps them in the solution. I also put a filter on top because of all the pollution in the air. Then I set it out in the moon light and take it inside in the morning. This makes for some potent Ormus. I put a pyramid on top and have a Tesla Purple Plate and Orgone in the tank to give good vibes during the birthing process also.

I have been having problems with using Lye so this time I used Baked Baking Soda, also known as Washing Soda or Natron, instead and had great results. More information here:

http://www.eck-tech.com/DIY.php



Ormus is the final result of a natural & ancient alchemical process beginning with Dead Sea salt and Rosemary and ending with isolated noble metals including osmium, iridium, platinum, gold, rhodium, silver, and palladium in a monoatomic form. Abundant research on this substance indicates it is superconductive and capable of carrying and transmitting 'light' or electromagnetic energy. Ormus is considered extremely important for full spectrum body building

Ormus appears to assist communication between cells in the body and between the body and spirit. It seems to increase mental clarity, focus, rejuvenation, sense of calmness and intuition. Some people have reported improved vision, better digestion and a decrease of menopausal symptoms.


Ormus seems to stimulate the body's elimination of toxins. It is good to drink plenty of water and do a liver cleanse if possible in the early stages of ingesting Ormus. Liver and kidneys are the main organs moving the toxins out of the blood and eliminating them from the body. If they are not functioning properly, harmful toxic build-up may occur in these organs. This is rarely the case though, especially when starting with suggested amount and only ingesting Ormus that is carefully tested for its purity.

There is a sense of expanded comprehension and strength that is due to the natural reaction your body is having to the noble metals in a high spin state. Ormus gives you a feeling of "bliss" and calmness that comes from a simultaneous earth and universal connection. Ormus appears to enhance and activate your full brain creating neurons to fire more efficiently and effectively, allowing for new possibility of thought, while old thought patterns that adhere to a lower vibration fade away.

Ormus also has ability to restore one's natural intuitive awareness. It aligns the individual with one's own personal genius , your innate skill that you came to share with the world. Ormus also enhances your ability to create, opening up possibilities, canceling out unwanted futures due to the increased vibrational state.


These statements have not been evaluated by FDA and are not intended to prevent, cure or treat disease.

Rosemary Ormus

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