Creatine Ormus Powder

Even if you’re not a weight lifter, you’ve undoubtedly heard of creatine, one of the most researched supplements in history.

It’s a combination of amino acids produced by the liver, kidney, and pancreas. Creatine is not a steroid—it’s naturally found in muscle and in red meat and fish, though at far lower levels than in the powder form sold on bodybuilding websites and at your local GNC.

How does it work? Creatine reduces fatigue by transporting extra energy into your cells, says Ari Levy, M.D., who works with patients at the Program for Personalized Health and Prevention at the University of Chicago Medical Center. Adenosine triphosphate, or ATP, is the compound your body uses for energy. For a muscle to contract, it breaks off a phosphate molecule from ATP. As a result, ATP becomes ADP (adenosine diphosphate). The problem: You can’t use ADP for energy, and your body only has so much stored ATP. The fix: ADP takes a phosphate molecule from your body’s stores of creatine phosphate, forming more ATP.

If you have more creatine phosphate—which you do if you take a creatine supplement—you can work out longer and do sets of, say, eight reps instead of six. Over weeks and months, that added workload allows you to add lean muscle mass, lift heavier weights, and become stronger.

But should you worry about side effects? Does creatine cause you to lose weight when you stop it, or does it hurt your kidneys, like you may have heard? Here are the key myths and facts you need to know.

Creatine is similar to anabolic steroids. Myth. Steroids mimic testosterone and are banned in the Olympics and in professional sports. By contrast, the International Olympic Committee, professional sports leagues, and the National Collegiate Athletic Association do not prohibit creatine. (The NCAA won’t let colleges give it to athletes, though.)

Creatine can help you build muscle mass without hitting the gym. Myth. It shows some improvement in kids with muscular dystrophy, even if they’re not exercising, says Mark Tarnopolsky, M.D., Ph.D., professor of pediatrics and medicine and director of the neuromuscular and neurometabolic clinic at McMaster University Medical Center in Ontario. “[But] the best effect in healthy humans is seen when creatine is combined with resistance exercise training.”

Creatine causes gastrointestinal upset. True—but it’s rare. Tarnopolsky says his studies show 5 to 7 percent of people experience either stomach aches, diarrhea, or both.

Creatine will help you run a faster 5K. Myth. Creatine helps athletes with more fast-twitch muscle fibers (used to swing a baseball bat) more than athletes with more slow-twitch ones (used by marathon runners). “If you’re an endurance athlete, if you’re not doing something that involves the fast-twitch muscle fibers, you don’t need to be on creatine,” says orthopedic surgeon Tony Wanich, M.D., a sports medicine specialist at Montefiore Medical Center in New York.

Creatine causes weight gain. Fact. (But that’s kind of the point.) It pulls H2O into your muscles, which causes water-weight gain and makes muscles look bigger initially. (You don’t actually gain muscle fibers until you work out.) “Creatine is a molecule that has a very strong attraction for water,” says Gordon Purser, Ph.D., a professor of chemistry at the University of Tulsa who studies creatine and has used it himself for the past decade. No two people will have the same results. “Weight gain of about 0.8 to 2.9 percent of body weight in the first few days of creatine supplementation occurs in about two-thirds of users,” says Christine Rosenbloom, Ph.D., R.D., sports dietitian for Georgia State University Athletics and editor in chief of Sports Nutrition: A Practice Manual for Professionals. What can you expect after the water weight gain? In a study of 20-year-olds taking creatine and doing weight training, Tarnopolsky found some gained two pounds of muscle but one even gained 17 pounds of it—with the same amount of supplement and the same training.

Creatine doesn’t work well for everyone. True. “One major factor with creatine is that some people have high levels in muscle naturally,” says Tarnopolsky. Meat and fish eaters are less likely to respond than vegans, who have low levels in their diet. Your muscle makeup matters, too. Most people have about 50 percent fast-twitch fibers (responsible for sprinting and jumping) and 50 percent slow-twitch fibers (responsible for endurance exercise), says Peter Adhihetty, Ph.D., assistant professor in the department of applied physiology and kinesiology at the University of Florida in Gainesville. Those guys should respond well. But people with 70 percent fast-twitch and 30 percent slow-twitch muscle will see even more results, he says.

Creatine makes you look softer. True. There’s a reason bodybuilders stop using creatine a month or so before a competition. “As the creatine hydrates itself, it causes water to flow into the muscle. That extra water may increase the volume of the muscles, but it also makes them look mushy rather than defined,” says Purser. Your move: Take it during the fall, winter, and spring to build muscle. Go off it during the summer to show off your beach abs.

Creatine users will lose muscle when they stop taking the supplement. Myth. Your muscles may look smaller because creatine adds water volume. “The real question is, ‘Will you maintain your strength and muscle mass, dry muscle mass, when you discontinue the use of creatine?' ” says Purser. “The answer to that is absolutely yes. Once you have built the muscle, as long as you continue to lift, you will maintain it.”

You shouldn’t take too much creatine. Fact. “It is illogical to take more than 20 grams a day for a week max or seven grams a day for months,” says Tarnopolsky. “[There is] no evidence that this would do anything more in terms of loading the muscle, so why on earth would someone waste money and time and effort for unknown risks and zippo added benefit. Anything in the world—sugar, coffee, fat, protein, salt—taken in excess can lead to health issues.”

The fine print: See your doctor first if you have high blood pressure or diabetes, if you regularly take any prescription meds or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs like ibuprofen (which can tax the kidneys), if you’re over age 40 (since kidney function slowly declines after age 30), or if you have a history of kidney or liver disease.

Creatine Ormus Powder

This Ormus Powder is made from adding creatine powder, Dead Sea Salt, and Sea 90, to warm structured water. Then I preformed the John Hudson method by adding Organic Dolomite and swinging the PH. Then after washing it 7 times and drying it out, it is now a fine Ormus powder. Not surprisingly it had a large yield of percipitate meaning its full of goodies.


The White Powder of Gold is a multitude of things.  It is in essence, the Elixir of Life. It is likewise, The Philosopher’s Stone of Alchemy, the “manna” of the ancient Hebrews, and even the MFKZT “What is it?” of the ancient Egyptians.  In science, the white powder of gold is the ORME -- i.e. gold (or any of the Precious Metals) in a monoatomic form -- which can result in Superconductivity within an organic body.  

When the white powder of gold is mixed in water, it becomes the Elixir of Life, the alchemist’s dream -- also known as The Golden Tear from the Eye of Horus, or “That which issues from the mouth of the creator.”  It was also called as the “spittle of God” -- not the word of God, but the spittle.  Others referred to it as the semen of the father in heaven.  [Putting the white powder in water doesn’t result in it dissolving.  Instead, it forms a gelatinous suspension, and looks very much like a vial of semen.]  

For the alchemists, the goal had always been to make the white powder of gold, to make  “the container of the light of life.”  Thereafter, if you stood in its presence, you wouldn’t age.  If you partook of it, you would live for ever.  It’s history goes back to Enoch, Thoth, Hermes Trisgetimus, the same man by any other name, who ascended to heaven by partaking of the white drops, and thereby avoided death.  

In The Egyptian Book of the Dead and the Papyrus of Ani, by Budge -- based on a papyrus from Old Kingdom Egypt -- there is a curious repetition of the phrase, “What is it?”  Samples from the papyrus reads, “I am purified of all imperfections.  What is it?  I ascend like the golden hawk of Horus.  What is it?  I pass by the immortals without dying.  What is it?  I come before my father in Heaven.  What is it?”  The latter question repeats itself for hundreds of times throughout the lengthy ancient document.

The “What is it?” literally translates into Hebrew as “manna”.  Even a modern dictionary may define manna as “What is it?”.  The manna was the “bread” taken by the high priest, the Melchizedek priest.  Moses told the Hebrew people at one point, “You have not kept the covenant, and so the manna is being taken from you.  But it will come back in the end times.  When we will be a nation of high priests, not an elect high priesthood.

The manna, the white powder of gold, is the food, the light, one takes into their body.  It is the Food of the Gods.  A modern day Rabbi might tell you that no one has known how to make the manna, the white powder of Gold, since the destruction of the Temple of Solomon.  The technique is, supposedly, a lost art or lost knowledge.  But others argue that when the high priests left the Temple (when it was destroyed), the took the secret out into the desert and organized a commune called Qumrun.  There, they became the Essenes.  Eventually, the white powder was used to nourish a woman named Mary, and eventually, she gave birth to a man named Jesus.  Some claim that it was the white powder of gold which allowed Jesus his many gifts, including his ascension into heaven.  

These gifts include:  perfect telepathy, the ability to know good and evil when it’s present, and to project thoughts into another person’s mind.  There is also the ability to levitate, or to walk on water.  By excluding all external magnetic fields (including the Earth’s gravity), the white powder of gold takes one beyond the four dimensional space time continuum, and the individual becomes a fifth dimensional being.  They can literally think where they would like to be, and go there.  They can heal by the laying on of hands, and can cleanse and resurrect the dead within two or three days after they died.  They have so much energy that they can literally embrace people and bring light and energy back into them.   

In Revelations, it says, “Blessed be the man who shall overcome, for he shall be given the hidden manna, the white stone of the purest kind upon which will be written a new name.”  He will not be the same person.  [Obviously!]   

In the modern parlance, the white powder of gold is the ORME-- Orbitally Rearranged Monatomic Elements.  The ORME is obtained from the Precious Metals (Gold, Platinum, Silver, Palladium, Osmium, Ruthenium, Rhodium and Iridium).  Superdeformation of Nuclei of these precious elements, results in a monoatomic, superconducting, high spin, low energy state, wherein -- in accordance with ORME Physics and ORME Biology -- the extraordinary characteristics of the white powder of gold can be manifested.  

Basically, everything is encoded in each individual’s DNA, waiting to be activated.  Care for a cup of life?

These statements have not been evaluated by FDA and are not intended to prevent, cure or treat disease.

Creatine Ormus Powder

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